Alimed Freedom Accommodative Orthotic #1 Best Selling

$24.05

  • Dual-layer accommodative insoles
  • Provides gentle, long-term support
  • These accommodative insoles are generally used without modification
  • Proven Plantar Fasciitis relief

Sizes: A (W: 5-6)
B (W: 6-8, M: 7-8)
C (W: 8-9.5, M: 8-9)
D (W: 10, M: 9 – 10.5)
E (W: 11, M: 10.5 – 11)
F (W: 12, M: 11-12)
G (M: 12 – 13)

Packaging:
1 Pair

Visit our Orthotics, Supports and Braces Category

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Description

Alimed Freedom Accomodative OrthoticAlimed Freedom Accommodative Orthotic

  • Dual-layer accommodative orthotic insoles
  • Provides gentle, long-term support
  • These accommodative orthotic insoles are generally used without modification
  • Proven Plantar Fasciitis relief

Sizes: A (W: 5-6)
B (W: 6-8, M: 7-8)
C (W: 8-9.5, M: 8-9)
D (W: 10, M: 9 – 10.5)
E (W: 11, M: 10.5 – 11)
F (W: 12, M: 11-12)
G (M: 12 – 13)

Packaging:
1 Pair

Visit our Orthotics, Supports and Braces Category.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are orthotics?

Some people refer to orthotics as “arch supports,” but they do more than that! Orthotics are shoe inserts that help to correct improper foot alignment during activities like walking and running. Even though orthotics work directly on foot position, they also affect the alignment of ankles, knees, hips, and the low back, because everything is linked together in a biomechanical chain! The guide below will help you determine how to find the right pair of over-the-counter orthotics for your foot type.

Foot Types and Orthotic Qualities:

  • Low arched feet or flat feet are those that do not have much of a gap between the floor and the arch of the foot when standing. This foot type is very flexible and needs a rigid orthotic.
    o Rigid Orthotic: This type of orthotic controls the motion in the foot. Look for an orthotic that is inflexible with good arch support. Push down on the arch. If it collapses under finger pressure, it is not rigid enough. Note that this type of orthotic may feel strange when first worn because of its rigidity and shape.
  • High arched feet are those that have a large gap between the floor and the arch of the foot when standing. This foot type tends to be rigid and needs a soft accommodative orthotic.
    o Soft Accommodative Orthotic: This type of orthotic is also known as an accommodative orthotic and is somewhat flexible and is cushioned so it can absorb the shock of running. Look for an accommodative orthotic that has flexibility and cushioning, but that still supports the arch and has some stiffness. Note that this type of orthotic may need to be replaced more often once the shock absorption capabilities have worn out.

How to Tell if it’s the Right Fit?

Once you have selected a pair of orthotics, take them out of the packaging and place them on the floor. While barefoot or in just stocks, stand on both pieces before you place them in shoes. If you are shopping for an orthotic for flat feet, note the arch support in the orthotic: does it work? If you are shopping for a soft orthotic, does it seem to absorb shock and provide enough cushioning?

Fitting the Orthotics to Your Shoes:
Your accommodative orthotics may have to be trimmed down around the toe area in order to fit into your shoes. Follow the instructions on the package, trimming off only small sections at a time, following the curve from the ball of the foot all the way around the toes. After trimming a small section, attempt to insert them in your shoes. If they still do not fit, repeat. Remember: you can easily trim more off, but you can’t put it back if you trim too much!

Source: (nationwidechildrens.org)

What are some considerations?

Selecting a shoe insert from the wide variety of devices on the market can be overwhelming. Here are some podiatrist-tested tips to help you find the insert that best meets your needs:

  • Consider your health. Do you have diabetes? Problems with circulation? An over-the-counter insert may not be your best bet. Diabetes and poor circulation increase your risk of foot ulcers and infections, so schedule an appointment with a podiatrist. He or she can help you select a solution that won’t cause additional health problems.
  • Think about the purpose. Are you planning to run a marathon, or do you just need a little arch support in your work shoes? Look for a product that fits your planned level of activity.
  • Bring your shoes. For the insert to be effective, it has to fit into your shoes. So bring your sneakers, dress shoes, or work boots—whatever you plan to wear with your insert. Look for an insert that will fit the contours of your shoe.
  • Try them on. If all possible, slip the insert into your shoe and try it out. Walk around a little. How does it feel? Don’t assume that feelings of pressure will go away with continued wear.

Source: (apma.org)