Most Effective Cold Spray for Pain Relief – 1 Can

$5.10

* Our cold spray actually draws heat away from burns, which cools the skin and reduces both swelling and pain
* Also helps deaden the pain while removing splinters and reduces swelling when applied to bruises or sprains
* Active ingredients: Isobutane, N-butane, Propane

Packaging:
1 Can (4 oz.)

In stock

Description

Cold Spray for Pain

Deep Relief Maximum Strength Ice Cold Spray for Pain Relief

* Our cold spray for pain actually draws heat away from burns, which cools the skin and reduces both swelling and pain
* Cold spray for pain also helps deaden the pain while removing splinters and reduces swelling when applied to bruises or sprains
* Active ingredients: Isobutane, N-butane, Propane

Packaging:
1 Can (4 oz.)

For more visit our Ointments and Medications Category

Frequently Asked Questions

What is cold spray for pain?

Cold spray for pain (freeze spray or vapocoolant) is a type of aerosol spray product containing a liquified gas used for rapidly cooling surfaces, in medical and industrial applications. Cold spray for pain is usually sold in hand-held spray cans. It may consist of various substances, which produce different temperatures, depending on the application.

In medical applications, spray cans containing dimethyl ether or tetrafluoroethane may also be used to freeze and destroy tissue, for removal of warts and skin tags, or other uses in cryosurgery. Liquified petroleum gas including propane and butane is sometimes used. Cold spray for pain may also be used as a topical anesthetic, due to the numbing effect of cold, though there is risk of frostbite.

Chloroethane may be used as a topical pain reliever, and an alternative to ice pack therapy to reduce inflammation and swelling. Since its boiling point is well above the freezing point of water, there is less risk of freezing the skin, though it can still be dangerous if misused. It may be used to treat sports injuries, where it is sometimes known as ice spray or magic spray.

Source: (Wikipedia.org)

What is cryotherapy?

Cryotherapy, sometimes known as cold therapy, is the local or general use of low temperatures in medical therapy. Cryotherapy may be used to treat a variety of tissue lesions.[1] The most prominent use of the term refers to the surgical treatment, specifically known as cryosurgery or cryoablation. Cryosurgery is the application of extremely low temperatures to destroy abnormal or diseased tissue and is used most commonly to treat skin conditions.

Cryotherapy is used in an effort to relieve muscle pain, sprains and swelling after soft tissue damage or surgery. It can be a range of treatments from the application of ice packs or immersion in ice baths (generally known as cold therapy), to the use of cold chambers.

In addition to their use in cryosurgery, several types of cold aerosol sprays are used for short-term pain relief. Ordinary spray cans containing tetrafluoroethane, dimethyl ether, or similar substances, are used to numb the skin prior to or possibly in place of local anesthetic injections, and prior to other needles, small incisions, sutures, and so on. Other products containing chloroethane are used to ease sports injuries, similar to ice pack therapy.

Source: (Wikipedia.org)

Does a topical refrigerant spray reduce injection pain?

Early childhood experiences with painful injections may lead to anxiety and fear. These reactions need not develop if steps are taken to reduce the pain associated with injections. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a refrigerant topical anesthetic in reducing injection pain in preschool children experiencing routine diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT) immunizations. This double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted in community health clinics in conjunction with ongoing immunization programs. Ninety subjects, aged 4-5.5 years, were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (a) refrigerant topical anesthetic; (b) placebo topical spray; and (c) no-spray control. Pain was measured subjectively using a four-point visual analogue scale. Both the refrigerant topical anesthetic spray and the placebo spray significantly reduced injection pain. Age was found to be an important factor influencing pain response in this study. Parental anxiety was not a significant factor influencing pain response. In addition, parents were not good at predicting their child’s pain. The results of the study support the use of an intervention, such as refrigerant topical anesthetic, as a practical, simple, and effective treatment strategy for reduction of short-term painful procedures like injections.

Source: (pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov)