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Supra Strong Conforming Stretch Gauze Bandage 3″

$3.54 $3.44

Conforming stretch gauze bandages are knitted and provide a light compression. The conforming stretch gauze bandage holds the primary dressing in place which covers and protects the wound. The conforming gauze bandage length is 4.1 yards when stretched and is available in non-sterile bags.

Packaging:
12 Rolls Per Bag

SKU: PHC-52043 Category: Tags: ,

Description

Supra Conforming Stretch Gauze Bandage 3"3 inch Supra Conforming Stretch Gauze Bandage

Conforming stretch gauze bandages are knitted and provide a light compression. The conforming stretch gauze bandage holds the primary dressing in place which covers and protects the wound. The conforming gauze bandage length is 4.1 yards when stretched and is available in non-sterile bags.

Packaging:
12 Rolls Per Bag

Visit our Wound Care, Bandages and Tapes category

Frequently Asked Questions

How to apply a roller conforming stretch gauze bandage?

Roller conforming stretch gauze bandages are frequently used on extremities because of their ease in wrapping the limb and holding the dressing in place. After anchoring the roller gauze bandage it is applied in a spiral motion around the limb, moving from the distal end of the injury to the proximal end of the injury and then tied off.

Conforming roller gauze bandages are easily applied because the bandage material ‘sticks’ to itself.

Non-conforming gauze bandages require more attention and skill as the material ‘gaps’ and must be applied using a spiral reverse method.

Source: (www.emswebinfo.com)

What to know about Anchoring and Tying Off A Roller Gauze Bandage?

When applying roller gauze the bandage should be anchored to prevent slipping during the application process. Apply the roller gauze slightly distal to the dressing and make a complete wrap around the limb folding an inner corner back onto itself. Then wrap around the limb again, covering that folded corner which helps to stabilize and anchor the bandage in place.

Continue to wrap around the limb moving proximally until the dressing is completely covered. When complete the bandage can be tied off one of three ways:

Use a piece of tape to secure the end of the roller gauze in place.
Use a pair of scissors to cut the end of the roller gauze in half lengthwise and tie the ends around the limb securing the bandage.
Make a backwards wrap of the roller gauze forming two loose ends which can then be tied around the limb securing the bandage.

Source: (www.emswebinfo.com)

What to know about bandaging?

Covering a break in the skin helps to control bleeding and protect against infection. Dressings are pads of gauze or cloth that can be placed directly against the wound to absorb blood and other fluids. Cloth bandages cover dressings and hold them in place.

Step 1. Dress the wound

  • Put on gloves or use other protection to avoid contact with the victim’s blood.
  • Clean the wound with mild soap and water.
  • Apply a small layer of topical antibiotic if desired.
  • Place a clean dressing over the entire wound. Gauze dressings let in air for faster healing. Nonstick dressings have a special surface that won’t cling to the wound.
  • If blood soaks through the dressing, place another dressing over the first one.

Step 2. Cover the bandage

  • Wrap roller gauze or cloth strips over the dressing and around the wound several times.
  • Extend the bandage at least an inch beyond both sides of the dressing.
  • Don’t wrap the bandage so tight that it interferes with blood flow to healthy tissue.

Step 3. Secure the bandage

  • Tie or tape the bandage in place.
  • Don’t secure the bandage so tight that fingers or toes become pale or blue.

Step 4. Check circulation

  • Check circulation in the area below the bandage after several minutes and again after several hours. If circulation is poor, the skin may look pale or blue or feel cold. Signs of poor circulation also include numbness and tingling.
  • If circulation is reduced, loosen the bandage immediately. If symptoms continue, seek medical attention.

Source: (www.saintlukeskc.org)